Bundle haul

Oct. 16th, 2017 10:38 pm
[syndicated profile] eaglespath_feed

Confession time: I started making these posts (eons ago) because a close friend did as well, and I enjoyed reading them. But the main reason why I continue is because the primary way I have to keep track of the books I've bought and avoid duplicates is, well, grep on these posts.

I should come up with a non-bullshit way of doing this, but time to do more elegant things is in short supply, and, well, it's my blog. So I'm boring all of you who read this in various places with my internal bookkeeping. I do try to at least add a bit of commentary.

This one will be more tedious than most since it includes five separate Humble Bundles, which increases the volume a lot. (I just realized I'd forgotten to record those purchases from the past several months.)

First, the individual books I bought directly:

Ilona Andrews — Sweep in Peace (sff)
Ilona Andrews — One Fell Sweep (sff)
Steven Brust — Vallista (sff)
Nicky Drayden — The Prey of Gods (sff)
Meg Elison — The Book of the Unnamed Midwife (sff)
Pat Green — Night Moves (nonfiction)
Ann Leckie — Provenance (sff)
Seanan McGuire — Once Broken Faith (sff)
Seanan McGuire — The Brightest Fell (sff)
K. Arsenault Rivera — The Tiger's Daughter (sff)
Matthew Walker — Why We Sleep (nonfiction)

Some new books by favorite authors, a few new releases I heard good things about, and two (Night Moves and Why We Sleep) from references in on-line articles that impressed me.

The books from security bundles (this is mostly work reading, assuming I'll get to any of it), including a blockchain bundle:

Wil Allsop — Unauthorised Access (nonfiction)
Ross Anderson — Security Engineering (nonfiction)
Chris Anley, et al. — The Shellcoder's Handbook (nonfiction)
Conrad Barsky & Chris Wilmer — Bitcoin for the Befuddled (nonfiction)
Imran Bashir — Mastering Blockchain (nonfiction)
Richard Bejtlich — The Practice of Network Security (nonfiction)
Kariappa Bheemaiah — The Blockchain Alternative (nonfiction)
Violet Blue — Smart Girl's Guide to Privacy (nonfiction)
Richard Caetano — Learning Bitcoin (nonfiction)
Nick Cano — Game Hacking (nonfiction)
Bruce Dang, et al. — Practical Reverse Engineering (nonfiction)
Chris Dannen — Introducing Ethereum and Solidity (nonfiction)
Daniel Drescher — Blockchain Basics (nonfiction)
Chris Eagle — The IDA Pro Book, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Nikolay Elenkov — Android Security Internals (nonfiction)
Jon Erickson — Hacking, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Pedro Franco — Understanding Bitcoin (nonfiction)
Christopher Hadnagy — Social Engineering (nonfiction)
Peter N.M. Hansteen — The Book of PF (nonfiction)
Brian Kelly — The Bitcoin Big Bang (nonfiction)
David Kennedy, et al. — Metasploit (nonfiction)
Manul Laphroaig (ed.) — PoC || GTFO (nonfiction)
Michael Hale Ligh, et al. — The Art of Memory Forensics (nonfiction)
Michael Hale Ligh, et al. — Malware Analyst's Cookbook (nonfiction)
Michael W. Lucas — Absolute OpenBSD, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Bruce Nikkel — Practical Forensic Imaging (nonfiction)
Sean-Philip Oriyano — CEHv9 (nonfiction)
Kevin D. Mitnick — The Art of Deception (nonfiction)
Narayan Prusty — Building Blockchain Projects (nonfiction)
Prypto — Bitcoin for Dummies (nonfiction)
Chris Sanders — Practical Packet Analysis, 3rd Edition (nonfiction)
Bruce Schneier — Applied Cryptography (nonfiction)
Adam Shostack — Threat Modeling (nonfiction)
Craig Smith — The Car Hacker's Handbook (nonfiction)
Dafydd Stuttard & Marcus Pinto — The Web Application Hacker's Handbook (nonfiction)
Albert Szmigielski — Bitcoin Essentials (nonfiction)
David Thiel — iOS Application Security (nonfiction)
Georgia Weidman — Penetration Testing (nonfiction)

Finally, the two SF bundles:

Buzz Aldrin & John Barnes — Encounter with Tiber (sff)
Poul Anderson — Orion Shall Rise (sff)
Greg Bear — The Forge of God (sff)
Octavia E. Butler — Dawn (sff)
William C. Dietz — Steelheart (sff)
J.L. Doty — A Choice of Treasons (sff)
Harlan Ellison — The City on the Edge of Forever (sff)
Toh Enjoe — Self-Reference ENGINE (sff)
David Feintuch — Midshipman's Hope (sff)
Alan Dean Foster — Icerigger (sff)
Alan Dean Foster — Mission to Moulokin (sff)
Alan Dean Foster — The Deluge Drivers (sff)
Taiyo Fujii — Orbital Cloud (sff)
Hideo Furukawa — Belka, Why Don't You Bark? (sff)
Haikasoru (ed.) — Saiensu Fikushon 2016 (sff anthology)
Joe Haldeman — All My Sins Remembered (sff)
Jyouji Hayashi — The Ouroboros Wave (sff)
Sergei Lukyanenko — The Genome (sff)
Chohei Kambayashi — Good Luck, Yukikaze (sff)
Chohei Kambayashi — Yukikaze (sff)
Sakyo Komatsu — Virus (sff)
Miyuki Miyabe — The Book of Heroes (sff)
Kazuki Sakuraba — Red Girls (sff)
Robert Silverberg — Across a Billion Years (sff)
Allen Steele — Orbital Decay (sff)
Bruce Sterling — Schismatrix Plus (sff)
Michael Swanwick — Vacuum Flowers (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka — Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 1: Dawn (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka — Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 2: Ambition (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka — Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 3: Endurance (sff)
Tow Ubukata — Mardock Scramble (sff)
Sayuri Ueda — The Cage of Zeus (sff)
Sean Williams & Shane Dix — Echoes of Earth (sff)
Hiroshi Yamamoto — MM9 (sff)
Timothy Zahn — Blackcollar (sff)

Phew. Okay, all caught up, and hopefully won't have to dump something like this again in the near future. Also, more books than I have any actual time to read, but what else is new.

Free software log (September 2017)

Oct. 15th, 2017 09:47 pm
[syndicated profile] eaglespath_feed

I said that I was going to start writing these regularly, so I'm going to stick to it, even when the results are rather underwhelming. One of the goals is to make the time for more free software work, and I do better at doing things that I record.

The only piece of free software work for September was that I made rra-c-util compile cleanly with the Clang static analyzer. This was fairly tedious work that mostly involved unconfusing the compiler or converting (semi-intentional) crashes into explicit asserts, but it unblocks using the Clang static analyzer as part of the automated test suite of my other projects that are downstream of rra-c-util.

One of the semantic changes I made was that the vector utilities in rra-c-util (which maintain a resizable array of strings) now always allocate room for at least one string pointer. This wastes a small amount of memory for empty vectors that are never used, but ensures that the strings struct member is always valid. This isn't, strictly speaking, a correctness fix, since all the checks were correct, but after some thought, I decided that humans might have the same problem that the static analyzer had. It's a lot easier to reason about a field that's never NULL. Similarly, the replacement function for a missing reallocarray now does an allocation of size 1 if given a size of 0, just to avoid edge case behavior. (I'm sure the behavior of a realloc with size 0 is defined somewhere in the C standard, but if I have to look it up, I'd rather not make a human reason about it.)

I started on, but didn't finish, making rra-c-util compile without Clang warnings (at least for a chosen set of warnings). By far the hardest problem here are the Clang warnings for comparisons between unsigned and signed integers. In theory, I like this warning, since it's the cause of a lot of very obscure bugs. In practice, gah does C ever do this all over the place, and it's incredibly painful to avoid. (One of the biggest offenders is write, which returns a ssize_t that you almost always want to compare against a size_t.) I did a bunch of mechanical work, but I now have a lot of bits of code like:

     if (status < 0)
         return;
    written = (size_t) status;
    if (written < avail)
        buffer->left += written;

which is ugly and unsatisfying. And I also have a ton of casts, such as with:

    buffer_resize(buffer, (size_t) st.st_size + used);

since st.st_size is an off_t, which may be signed. This is all deeply unsatisfying and ugly, and I think it makes the code moderately harder to read, but I do think the warning will potentially catch bugs and even security issues.

I'm still torn. Maybe I can find some nice macros or programming styles to avoid the worst of this problem. It definitely requires more thought, rather than just committing this huge mechanical change with lots of ugly code.

Mostly, this kind of nonsense makes me want to stop working on C code and go finish learning Rust....

Anyway, apart from work, the biggest thing I managed to do last month that was vaguely related to free software was upgrading my personal servers to stretch (finally). That mostly went okay; only a few things made it unnecessarily exciting.

The first was that one of my systems had a very tiny / partition that was too small to hold the downloaded debs for the upgrade, so I had to resize it (VM disk, partition, and file system), and that was a bit exciting because it has an old-style DOS partition table that isn't aligned (hmmm, which is probably why disk I/O is so slow on those VMs), so I had to use the obsolete fdisk -c=dos mode because I wasn't up for replacing the partition right then.

The second was that my first try at an upgrade died with a segfault during the libc6 postinst and then every executable segfaulted. A mild panic and a rescue disk later (and thirty minutes and a lot of swearing), I tracked the problem down to libc6-xen. Nothing in the dependency structure between jessie and stretch forces libc6-xen to be upgraded in lockstep or removed, but it's earlier in the search path. So ld.so gets upgraded, and then finds the old libc6 from the libc6-xen package, and the mismatch causes immediate segfaults. A chroot dpkg --purge from the rescue disk solved the problem as soon as I knew what was going on, but that was a stressful half-hour.

The third problem was something I should have known was going to be an issue: an old Perl program that does some internal stuff for one of the services I ran had a defined @array test that has been warning for eons and that I never fixed. That became a full syntax error with the most recent Perl, and then I fixed it incorrectly the first time and had a bunch of trouble tracking down what I'd broken. All sorted out now, and everything is happily running stretch. (ejabberd, which other folks had mentioned was a problem, went completely smoothly, although I suspect I now have too many of the plugin packages installed and should do a purging.)

coffeeandink: (Default)
[personal profile] coffeeandink
These are very gossipy shallow reactions, but maybe I will get back into the swing of posting, who knows.

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend S03E01 )

Jane the Virgin S04E01 )
elf: John Egbert with a rocketpack, captioned "THIS IS STUPID" in all caps. (This is stupid)
[personal profile] elf
I have to watch episodes with several breaks, because TEH STOOPID bothers me.

I mean, there's the standard TV show stupid where characters have to tell each other things that they already know, so that we the audience can catch up on what happened since last season. Fine. Normal TV stupid.

There's the stupid of watching combat scenes - streets somehow devoid of cars except for those belonging to the villains; martial artists spinning into HTH despite facing their opponents and having a clear path between them (you don't turn your back on an enemy if you don't get something from it - sure, spinning around may get you leverage for an attack, but nobody did that); old Western-style one-shot-insta-death bullet wounds (except, of course, for any character with a name), and so on. TV violence stupid. Fine. Normal.

There's the interpersonal drama stupid, which includes both "let's talk about stuff that we would never directly say, except for the audience to catch up" and "let's make sure the audience has been informed, AGAIN, of exactly who has what relationship with whom." Bleh. Fine. Gotta throw in some backstory exposition for the new watchers. Then there's the mind games and secrets bullshit, where everyone pretends that they haven't spent five years learning that you need to rely on your teammates and that means telling them when something weird is going on. Fine. Emotionally constipated characters in order to stretch out the tension.

There's also spoilerific stupid, so I'm putting that behind a cut. )
coffeeandink: (Default)
[personal profile] coffeeandink
The Good Place is such a delight I don't even know how to talk about it. All I want to do is burble.

If you're not watching it, it's a half-hour afterlife comedy about a slacker (Kristen Bell) who has been accidentally misassigned to the "Good Place" (Heaven) after her death, and has to keep the mistake secret from the powers that be (Ted Danson), while trying to figure out how to be a good person -- or at least a good enough person not to stick out. Fortunately for her, she's assigned a soulmate (William Harper Jackson) who was an ethics professor in life.

I don't know how to convince you to watch this. The show is so much stranger, more surreal, and sillier than the setup portends. It is hilarious and moving; it burns through plot like a brushfire (avoid spoilers, I mean it); and the cast is so good, I mean, they are so amazing, not just Bell and Danson, but newcomers like Jackson and D'Arcy Carden as an omniscient database and Jameela Jamil as a socialite philanthropist and Manny Jacinto as a surprising sweetheart. The first season is streaming on Netflix and the second season is airing now.

Spoiler note: the numbering for this season is confusing, since some sources consider the first hour, aired together in a single night, as a single episode. I don't. The latest episode I discuss below the spoiler cut aired 10/12/17.

Spoilers have a thirteen-point scale where eight is the highest score )

I suppose I'm getting some Pathfinder

Oct. 11th, 2017 08:31 pm
elf: Life's a die, and then you bitch. (Gamer Geek)
[personal profile] elf
I have basically played no D&D since 1st ed AD&D. I remember writing up a character in 2nd ed (oh look; elves can finally be druids!) and again in... 3.5, maybe? But I don't remember actually playing in either of those; if I did, it was a single session of getting-the-party-together that later went nowhere.

I'm vaguely aware that D&D and Pathfinder are similar but not the same. I don't particularly need to know; until D&D gives up on the stupidity that is alignments (I do hear they've dropped alignment languages, at least) and the notion of dozens of character classes to allow variety instead of switching to a point system that actually lets people build the players they want... not particularly interested. D&D as a system is designed for a particular type of play, or at best, a particular range of types of play, none of which appeal to me.

I keep coming back to, "why aren't they using GURPS" if they want granular details about combat and character building, or, "why don't they switch to FATE" if they want free-flowing story adventures.

Anyway. Humble Bundle has Pathfinder books on sale, and in the way of HB, a large swarm are available for the $1 minimum. I'll get that.

I scrolled down. Normally, there's a $1 ("pay what you want") level, a mid ($8 here), and a $15 level. This time, there's also higher levels. At the top, for $45, you can get a set of miniatures.

The Red Sonja figurine shows everything I hate about D&D, the high fantasy genre, and the tabletop RPG industry.

Coming Out Day

Oct. 11th, 2017 02:41 pm
emceeaich: The Queen Mother Has a Plan. Be glad you do not figure in it. (hwa yong)
[personal profile] emceeaich

I'm hella lesbian.

emceeaich: (cylon baby jesus!)
[personal profile] emceeaich

There are spoilers below.

Read more... )

This is a stunning movie.

But the experience of the women in the movie, including the ones who live, disappoints me.

House Rules

Oct. 10th, 2017 11:49 pm
emceeaich: A close-up of a pair of cats-eye glasses (Default)
[personal profile] emceeaich

This is my living room, so moderation is at my will.

Bugzilla, Triage, and Mozilla-related posts are under the planetmozilla tag.

  • no personal attacks
  • no nazis, no apologizing for nazis
  • no misogynistic, femme-phobic, homophobic, transphobic, bi-phobic, pan-phobic, non-binary-phobic, fat-phobic, or racist comments
  • no feigned surprise
  • if you don't know pronouns, ask
  • The singular ‘they’ is always correct
  • use content warnings
  • stay in your lane
  • content in violation of California and/or US Law will get you banned

If you see violations, report so I can remove, block, and respond as necessary.


Confirmed Survey 1. Upon arrival you will report for debriefing. And just one more thing, on your trip back I want you to take the time to learn the Babylon 5 mantra. 'Ivanova is always right. I will listen to Ivanova. I will not ignore Ivanova's recommendations. Ivanova is God.' And if this ever happens again
[shouts]
Ivanova will personally rip your lungs out! Babylon control out.
[to herself]
Civilians.
[looks up]
Just kidding about that God part. No offense.– Lt. Cmdr. Susan Ivanova, Babylon 5, S1E18





emceeaich: A woman in glasses with grey hair, from the eyes up, wearing a hairband with 'insect antenna' deelie-boppers (bugmaster)
[personal profile] emceeaich

I'm not finding them useful. They were reporting back to June of last year but not capturing release cycles.

I have a spreadsheet for watching bugs which need a decision for the Firefox Quantum (57) release.

I'm defining decision differently than triage. Triage is an engineering decision on priority; decision means if the bug would affect 57. And there are plenty of bugs to review. It's a large haystack and we're trying ways to find the bugs that could affect our release.

If you want to see all un-triaged bugs, you can still view the snapshot report.

hey, neat! (trek stuff)

Oct. 10th, 2017 12:17 am
eleanorjane: The Enterprise at warp speed (vroom)
[personal profile] eleanorjane
I haven't watched Discovery yet, but I know Trek has been on peoples' minds as a result of its launch.

I have rediscovered, back in 2009, a series of posts I wrote summarising material gleaned from the Star Trek RPG then published by LUG and Decipher, as a primer to help people new to Trek pick up a bunch of canon-ish background material relatively easily.

As it's eight years old, I thought I'd give it a bump since Trek is back in the collective consciousness again.

The posts are on my canon: star trek tag. They generally haven't been updated to incorporate anything relating to AOS (except one bit), and refer almost entirely to the prime universe/timeline. Re-linked, since someone out there might find it useful.

Yuletide comes but once a year

Oct. 8th, 2017 09:17 pm
naraht: (other-Yuletide squee)
[personal profile] naraht
This is probably the right time to mention that I'm not signing up for Yuletide this year.

I've been doing Yuletide since 2006, with the only gap being in 2007 when I was busy submitting my thesis (and even that year, somebody wrote me an NYR, so I feel that I participated in spirit). My love for Yuletide is, in theory, undimmed. But.

Work has been utterly mad recently, and is likely to stay that way until mid-November at least. More importantly, my love for Yuri!!! on Ice is still flaring, and I seem to be in the middle of a fic that's likely to be 25k+ when it's finished. (I've just posted chapter 2, go and read!) I am absolutely positively not letting anything get in the way of finishing this fic, including Yuletide. It needs to be finished by Christmas, ideally by the end of November, and without a doubt by the time that the 2018 Olympics actually happen.

Finally, I have to admit that I feel a little relieved at the notion of flying home for my Christmas holidays this year with absolutely nothing hanging over my head, not even a Yuletide story to be posted.

I'll be cheering all of you on; I'll be reading and bookmarking letters; I'll definitely hang out in chat from mid-December on; and if the fates align, I'll try to pick up a treat or two. But as for the rest of it... maybe next year. Alas.

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Ceri B.

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